Small yard Tipps: easy chicken coop ideas!



Do you have a small yard, and you entertain the idea of having a chicken coop? Then you have come to the right place. Our chicken coop mentality is having it all and having it fuss-free like our automatic chicken coop door.


This article is for those of you with a small square yard, long narrow yard, yard with a fence, or a yard with overflowing bushes. These situations can easily house your chickens and their lovely chicken coop.

You can successfully raise your chickens for eggs, even on the smallest of scales. Many backyard chicken raisers do not have a large yard or ample space to house their chickens but have fun with chicken raising.



Anybody can make it work depending on what kind of breed you are planning to raise or already have. If you make your chicken coop or if you decide to buy one, it is good to know that your coop should have:


1. a strong roof,

2. provides a lot of weather protection,

3. a lot of ventilation (automatic and analog),

4. a wire around and above where the chickens reside by day and night, a nice chicken run that is predator proofed and an automatic chicken coop door,

5. safe edges for chickens and humans so they do not catch themselves on anything,

6. surfaces that are easy to clean.


These six tips are easy to read but harder to procure, but if you take one step at a time, you will get there and have free-range eggs and a small yard full of happy chickens. Ideally, you want to raise three to four chickens in a small yard. Your chicken coop is a protective enclosure for your flock, and you don't have to be a do-it-yourself expert; even beginners should be up to the task if they find the right chicken coop plan.



Chicken coops come in many shapes, styles, and sizes depending on your small yard needs, just like all the different types of chicken breeds. Some chicken coops are harder to make or put together; others require a bit more manual labor.


You can find a lot of variety on the market, but it is good to imagine what kind of a coop will be ok in your backyard. So, a sketch or two does not hurt. When sketching, you can also factor in:


· The coop's location - must ensure protection from the weather conditions of your area.

· Chicken coop size and shape. One chicken needs about three squares of space, so you will have to factor in the size of your chicken coop depending on the size of your flock.

· Material needed for your chicken coop. Will you buy a kit coop that will have everything enclosed, or will you purchase your materials new or second-hand from other people's projects? Some of you will probably look in your garage and shed and find plenty of material to use.

· The time needed to build your coop is dependent on your skill level or material. However, you will have to devote some time to develop and prepare your chicken coop.




Why build a small backyard chicken coop? Because it is manageable, easy to clean, set up, repair if something goes wrong, and is cost-effective.


To give you a better idea, we can look at different types of chicken coops.


1. The Classic. Wooden Chicken Coop is easy to make yourself, and it cleans well.

2. The chicken hut can be tall and lean for those in narrow backyards.

3. A recycled Pallet Chicken Coops is exceptionally easy to clean and cannot house insects because of the plastic material.

4. A-frame chicken coop or an Ark is a pyramid-style coop with – an exciting design with a lot of ventilation with its high ceiling.

5. A repurposed Toddlers Crib. An easy solution to not-so-new parents that have a leftover crib.

6. A raised, off-the-ground chicken coop suitable near the forest and lots that attract predators.



7. A Chicken tractor. A portable chicken coop is good if you would like to free-range your chickens and move them around.

8. A repurposed Dog House Coop – if you have a dog house and no dog and you would like to have chickens instead of a dog.

9. Raised off-the-ground chicken coop with a twist of a green roof – if you like plants and eggs, this chicken coop is visually stunning and good for the environment.

10. A repurposed small shed chicken coop. If you have found a shed or want to buy a bigger one, no need to throw the old one away, repurpose it, and voila, you have a new chicken coop already in your backyard.



Remember, a chicken coop isn't just for safekeeping your chickens. It is a valuable visual item on your property and a valuable pet and egg house for your family and friends.


With our helpful tips, you can compare different chicken coop plans for the small backyards mentioned above. Then, you can adapt the plans to your liking, space, and abilities. Waste no time. Get started now and enjoy your new pets and eggs. Always have fun; that is what chicken raising is all about!

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